Women in Science and Technology: Meet Tina Nguyen from Datarwe

News - 27 Nov 2020

Tina is a Data Scientist at Datarwe, a data-driven technology company headquartered at Cohort Innovation Space at Lumina.

Datarwe uses high-quality, real world data to design analytics platforms and tools that accelerates AI model development and improves research and medical outcomes in the healthcare space.

What does a Data Scientist do?

At Datarwe, I work as a data scientist. That means my tasks are all about data, ranging from querying data, analysing, cleaning, enriching and modelling data. The fortunate thing is that I have chances to be exposed to valuable medical data and advanced cloud computing resources. Although there are still many challenges, I am passionate about the long-term purpose of Datarwe in developing the world’s most comprehensive medical research data platform.

What inspired you to become a data scientist?

When I did my PhD in Machine Learning at Griffith University, I wondered a lot about what I would do after graduating. My background was so heavily academic, but I really wanted to see how I could apply university knowledge to the industry (aka real-world things). Then I searched for jobs and realised that data-related workers like data analysts, data engineers and data scientists are in high-demand. With my background in Maths and Machine Learning, I wanted to become a data scientist.

What are some of the benefits of being based in the Gold Coast Health and Knowledge Precinct?

I feel so fortunate that Datarwe is based here. I love the Gold Coast and appreciate all the new opportunities here that this health and innovation hub brings to the Coast. The community is very friendly and inspiring.

How do you think AI has transformed the healthcare sector and what innovations do you think AI will help achieve in the future?

There is so much potential for Artificial Intelligence in the healthcare sector. Although AI is a long way from being able to replace clinicians, it can assist them and reduce a lot of their burden. With the development of AI and wearable devices, early detection will be significantly improved, and people can stay healthy and need to see doctors less often.

While AI isn’t exactly new, there is still a degree of uncertainty out there about how it will affect businesses and jobs – what do you think about this? If you could explain the benefit of AI to someone who had these concerns what would you say?

In my opinion, applying AI in different business areas is unavoidable. It is an opportunity that if we reject it, we will fall behind. And yes, any opportunity has its own potential risk, and it is where quality assurance plays a critical role.   Actually, the greatest risk is doing nothing.

Why did you choose Griffith University to pursue your PhD in Machine Learning?

I have a good friend who started his PhD in Machine Learning at Griffith University before me. He told me a lot about the people, study, and life on the Gold Coast. It was very difficult to get a PhD scholarship in Australia, but I was fortunate to have strong support from my friend and my PhD supervisor.

What has been your biggest achievement/accomplishment? Why is that?

My two sons, my PhD, and my data science career. And there will be so many fascinating things ahead.

You have previously been a Lecturer and a Tutor, what do you love most about educating the next generation?

I have the opportunity to understand their concerns and help them achieve their goals.

What are your thoughts on the representation of women in science and technology roles in Australia? What opportunities are there for women in the future?

There is a lot of support and opportunity for women who want to follow this career path. For example, in Queensland, we have the AI Hub, and the Gold Coast Health and Knowledge Precinct.  Women in AI can network here with like-minded people. Also, the demand in science and technology is increasing, so there will be more job opportunities in the future.